Easter Eggstra Special


This past, Thursday, when our 3 year old beloved son, Ittai, came home from school, he had with him a beautifully painted egg and I asked him what it was. He said it was an Easter egg. So I asked him, do you know the meaning of Easter? His response was “Eggs and Baskets.” Well, I tried explaining to Ittai, what Easter truly meant – that it was a celebration of Jesus’ victory over sin and death and how he rose from the grave – but I felt extremely inadequate in explaining resurrection to a three year old. I was also a little disappointed and mad at the world system that tries to take out the true meaning of a celebration, replacing it with something that is politically correct (case in point, Happy holidays for Merry Christmas, XMas for Christmas and Easter eggs/bunnies for the Resurrection).

Then on Easter morning after the service at the Austin Christian Fellowship of India, in which Pastor Samuel Madhavaraj preached about how the tomb of Christ was not only open but empty as well, one of the church members pointed Ittai to an Easter egg that was under his chair. Excitedly Ittai ran and picked up the egg, but when he opened it, it was empty. It was probably the remnant of an Easter egg hunt that may have taken place earlier that weekend. I saw the look of disappointment on Ittai’s face and as a father, I melted. Then it struck me. I took the empty egg, picked Ittai up, sat him on my lap and explained – “Ittai, you know how I asked you what Easter is all about?”. He nodded. “See, Easter is like this empty egg. The candy that was within is not there anymore. It has probably been taken out and eaten by someone who must have tasted and experienced how good it was. They must have enjoyed it. As long as the candy was in the egg, nobody could enjoy it. Now that the egg shell is empty and the candy is out, it can be enjoyed.” I continued, “in the same manner, Easter is like an empty egg. The tomb when Jesus was buried is empty. If he remained in the tomb, no one could have enjoyed his sweetness. The Bible says, O taste and see that the Lord is good. We must take Jesus (like candy) and accept him and take him into our lives so that he comes into us and becomes one with us. We can then truly enjoy his presence as a child would enjoy candy. Infact, Easter eggs that are empty is a poignant picture of the empty tomb. This is what Easter is.” I couldn’t tell if he fully understood what I was trying to say, but atleast, I hope that he recognizes, Easter is not about eggs and basket … but about an empty tomb, because Jesus, who was placed in the tomb, is risen – He is risen indeed. Death could not hold him; the grave could not keep him – He is alive.

Points to ponder:
Have you tasted the sweetness of the grace of God? In other words, have you received and believed in Christ Jesus, taking him into your lives so that you can truly relish and enjoy his presence, or, are you leaving Christ in the tomb as a child would leave candy within and Easter egg.

1 Corinthians 15:12-14 (KJV)
12 Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?
13 But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen:
14 And if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain.

Why seek ye the living among the dead?


When visiting the Holy Land Experience in Orlando, I took a picture of what was recreated as the tomb in which Jesus was laid, and what was interesting is that within this tomb, there was a plaque which read “He is not here, He is risen.” We just celebrated Easter in the year of the Lord 2010, and remembered his power over death and the grave (1 Corinthians 15:55-57), and his resurrection from the dead according to the scriptures (1 Corinthians 15:3-4), but did you realize that on the first Easter, there was a question that was posed, right in the tomb where Jesus was laid.

The first question that was asked in the tomb where Jesus Christ was laid after his resurrection by angels of God (Luke 24:23) was “Why seek ye the living among the dead?” (Luke 24:5-6). They further went on to affirm that “He (Jesus) is not here (in the tomb), but is risen”.

The answer to this question is of paramount significance. Within a tomb is dead men’s bones and uncleanliness (Matthew 23:27). When Jesus arose, He arose in His physical body (bones and flesh). This He affirms when He tells the disciples “that a spirit has neither bones nor flesh, as you see me have” (Luke 24:39). Acts 2:27,32 refers to Christ Jesus as the Holy One who was raised by God and He who is Holy is not unclean.

Jesus proclaimed verily that He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life (John 14:6); He is the Resurrection and he that believes in Him shall have eternal life, even though he was dead (John 11:25). Jesus is Life!

“Why seek ye the living among the dead?” is akin to asking “What communion can Light have with darkness?” Think about it, when you shine a light in a dark room, that room is no longer dark. The shining light takes over the darkness. So is the case, when Life encounters death, death is consumed. The sting of death is vanquished by the victory of Jesus’ resurrection ( 1 Corinthians 15:55-57) . Just as light and darkness cannot co-exist, Life and death cannot co-exist. You are either dead (not knowing Jesus Christ and God the Father who sent Him) or you are alive (knowing Jesus Christ and God the Father who sent Him) (John 17:3)

And of this we are to be witnesses (Luke 24:48), proclaiming that we don’t have to seek the living (Resurrected Jesus) among the dead (in the tomb), because Jesus is the Holy One of God, resurrected in his body (bones and flesh) and those who believe in Him; the Resurrection; shall have eternal life, i.e., be themselves resurrected from death unto life; unto newness of life. (2 Corinthians 5:17)

Revelation 20:6 (KJV)
Blessed and holy is he that hath part in the first resurrection: on such the second death hath no power, but they shall be priests of God and of Christ, and shall reign with him a thousand years.

For a related article, see “Living among the dead