No matter what – I will speak and teach


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

Why are there Christians today? Imagine that if for a moment, all of those who had seen and heard about what Jesus had done, stopped from speaking and teaching about it, what the state of affairs would be today? We would have not heard about the wonderful and redemptive work of Jesus for us all. The Bible possibly would not exist and those who claimed to be Christ followers (Christ Ones or Christians) would probably be just a long lost allegiance, if at all anyone knew about it today.

In today’s text, taken from Acts 4:13-31, we will look at two of the Apostles of Jesus Christ, Peter and John who chose to speak in the name of Jesus NO MATTER WHAT.

As a backdrop to this account, Peter and John heal a man who is lame in the name of Jesus (Act 3:11). They are then imprisoned for teaching about Jesus’ resurrection (Acts 4:1-4), brought before the Sanhendrin, where they preach again in the name and power of Jesus (Acts 4:7,10) and are then threatened to no longer teach or speak to any man in the name of Jesus (Acts 4:17-18). If they had rationalized or thought of the consequences of what the men in temporary power of the Sanhedrin could do to them, they may have succumbed to refraining from speaking and teaching about the God with eternal power. But with their focus on doing what is right in the sight of God and not man (Acts 4:19), they responded “For we cannot but speak the things which we have seen and heard” (Acts 4:20). In other words, they were saying, we will continue to speak and teach in the name of Jesus, NO MATTER WHAT. Their act of obedience to the great commission (Matthew 28:19-20) brought about glory to God (Acts 4:21) and today we know of the work of Jesus Christ because the early followers of Christ, could not stop from speaking and teaching in the name of Jesus. Nothing absolutely nothing, no power of man, imprisonment or fear of death could stop these Apostles from keeping to themselves from speaking and teaching about what Jesus had done for all mankind.

Points to ponder:

  1. Are we obedient to the call to speak and teach in the name of Jesus, that which we have heard (from his Word and His people) and seen (experienced)? What is it that we can do to make sure that we do according to what is right in the sight of God and not man?
  2. Can we take the step to speak and teach in the name of Jesus , without rationalizing or thinking of the consequences, NO MATTER WHAT?

No matter what – I will submit


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

In today’s text, taken from Matthew 26:39, we will look at none other but Jesus Christ himself who chose to submit to the will of God NO MATTER WHAT.

As a backdrop to this account, Jesus is in an intense state of physical, emotional and spiritual anguish in the garden of Gethsemane, evident from his sweating of blood (clinically known as hematohidrosis), as he looks forward toward enduring the Cross as the final payment for sin and death of all mankind. As He realizes that his body and Spirit will be undergo excruciating agony, being broken and separated from God, for He who knew no sin became sin (2 Corinthians 5:21), He makes a statement of total surrender and submission when he exclaims – “O my Father (God), if it be possible, let this cup (of God’s wrath) pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt.” In other words, Jesus was saying, not my will, but I will submit to yours, God the Father.

Despite any rationalization or thought on the consequences of his act of love and sacrifice, to die for all mankind, he still chose to totally submit to God’s will, NO MATTER WHAT. His act of total surrender to God made God exalt Him high and earned Him The Name that is above all names, The Name to which every knee will bow and confess that Jesus Christ is Sovereign Lord. (Philippians 2)

Points to ponder:

  1. What is God asking you and me to submit? Can we say, not my will, but I will submit totally to yours, LORD?
  2. Can we take the step to totally surrender and submit, without rationalizing or thinking of the consequences, NO MATTER WHAT?

No matter what – I will not bow


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

In today’s text, taken from Daniel 3, we will look at the three Hebrew men Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah known more familiarly as Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, who chose not to bow to any idol and worship NO MATTER WHAT.

As a backdrop to these characters, King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon had erected a statue (idol) of himself and decreed that all should fall down and worship it and those who failed to obey would be cast into a fiery furnace that very hour. Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, who were appointed administrators serving the king, chose to stand their ground and not succumb to this edict, knowing that in doing so, they would violate God’s commandments. When questioned by the king, they responded that their resolve in deed was, that they would not bow to his idol or worship him, irrespective of whether they are delivered or not. This infuriated the king who commands that the fire be heated seven times more and they are bound and cast in. Soon after the king witnesses that the three are loose, walking, not hurt and with them he see another whose appearance resembled that of the Son of God. The three are asked to come out of the fire by the king and they do. Seeing that they are free (who were bound) and who had quenched the thirst of the fiery furnace coming out unscathed and without a single singe, the king promulgates that there should be no longer any defiance against the God whom Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego worship, the one true God.

These men chose not to bow and worship any idol or image, NO MATTER WHAT. If Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego  had rationalized or thought of the consequences, they may have succumbed to the edict of the king. Of course the rational thought would have been that we are appointed to serve him, why not worship his image as well. The consequences of not following the king’s order meant immediate (within an hour) certain death by fire. However, their act of faithfulness to God not only did it deliver them from the fiery furnace, but also proved to the heathen king, that the God whom they served and solely worshiped had the power to meet his faithful ones, in the midst of the fiery situation they are in, and can break the bonds that bind them, and deliver them. These three chose not to bow to anyone or anything else, other than Jehovah God, NO MATTER WHAT and this meant that they were unwilling to violate God’s first and second commandments – You shall have no other gods before me and You shall not make any idols, even if such a decision meant the price to pay is your life. They knew that succumbing to the first death by fire was infinitesimally insignificant when compared to  the second death in the fiery lake of hell and so chose not to bow and worship the king’s image, NO MATTER WHAT.

Points to ponder:

  1. What are the idols/images that you and I succumb to (bow down) and worship (give preeminence) before God?
  2. Can we take the step to not bow and worship anyone or anything else, other than God, without rationalizing or thinking of the consequences, NO MATTER WHAT?

No matter what – I will pray


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

In today’s text, taken from Daniel 6:1-28, we will look at Daniel, who chose to pray NO MATTER WHAT.

Many of us are probably familiar with the story of Daniel in the lion’s den, but for the benefit of those who aren’t, as a backdrop to this character, Daniel was cast into a den of lions by king Darius, who was tricked by jealous conspirators, into signing a foolish decree that no one should make petition (pray) unto anyone else, except the king for a period of thirty days. These evil men knew that Daniel was faultless and fervent in his allegiance to the one true God, Jehovah, and sought to have him killed, for they knew that he would not compromise when it came to the matters of God or his commandments, the first being, you shall have no other gods before Jehovah, a.k.a., you shall not worship or pray to anyone else , except Jehovah. The law in the kingdom of Darius, a Medo-Persian kingdom was unchangeable, once ratified and sealed and so when the king was informed of Daniel’s continuance in prayer to Jehovah, not once but thrice a day, the king who favored Daniel, was now in a quandary and had to follow through with the decree. Daniel is thrown into the lions den, but miraculously, the mouth of the ravenous lions are held shut by the angel of God sent for his protection among the beasts. What the conspirators or the king had failed tor realize was that while the law of unchangeable, the lions were not. When juxtaposed between choosing life by not praying or choosing death by praying to God, Daniel chose to pray to God, NO MATTER WHAT. In other words, Daniel was not willing to refrain from praying, even if that meant, it would cost him his life.

If Daniel would had rationalized or thought of the consequences, he would have probably ended up like the majority, refraining from praying to God, and breaking His commandments, by praying to a man (the king Darius). This might have saved his life for a short while longer but in the end he would not have gone down in history as someone who had the privilege of spending a night with lions and living to tell its tale. His act of courage and faithfulness not only did it deliver him from the lion’s den, but also proved to the heathen kingdom, that the God whom he served is far more than able to deliver the righteous one out of any trouble, even from seemingly dire and deadly situations. Our acts of prayer can prove unto the unbelieving world that the God whom we pray to, is in deed able and is a personal, prayer answering God, unlike any other.

Points to ponder:

  1. What is God asking you and me to pray for?
  2. Can we take the step to pray to God, without rationalizing or thinking of the consequences, NO MATTER WHAT?

No matter what – I will bless the LORD at all times


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

In today’s text, taken from the book of Job, we will look at Job, who chose to bless the LORD at all times, NO MATTER WHAT.

Speculated to be chronologically one of the earliest books of the Bible, the book of Job tells the story of a man who loses everything, his health, his wealth and even his family, in spite of the fact that he was an upright man. His record begins with a heavenly debate between God and Satan and moves through three iterations of earthly debates between Job and his friends, in which they try to answer the question – Why; why is an upright man persecuted so gravely, that at one point, he even wishes death over his misery. In conclusion, the divine diagnosis yields the conclusion, that no matter what, the sovereignty of God is in fact unquestionable and mere acceptance of that is what God seeks of each of us. Job does indeed receive in return two times more than what he had lost (Job 42:10), but that is not the highlight of the entire account, although it may seem to be the case.  The highlight of Job’s life is his integrity and resolve to bless the LORD at all times, NO MATTER WHAT and despite him, losing his position (his servants were slain), his property (cattle taken away) and his paternity (children killed), he makes a very powerful statement; one that each of us should live each day with, which states “Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither: the LORD gave, and the LORD hath taken away: blessed be the name of the LORD.” (Job 1:21). Interestingly in parallel, Philippians 1:21 states, For to me to live is Christ and to die is gain.

If Job had rationalized the situation, he might have concluded that God was indeed evil, for having subjugated him under intense emotional, physical and mental turmoil, and he would have probably ended up like anyone else who cursed God and died. His act of integrity not only did it deliver him from all his troubles, but it also restored unto him twice as much as he had before, aand before he died full of days, he saw four generations. But most importantly, his act of integrity, did not let the head of God hang in shame. See God had boasted about Job to Satan and had questioned Satan, “Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? Job’s fervency and resolve to bless the LORD at all times, helped God to hold His head high and in essence, it would not be far fetched to say that a befitting conclusion to the life account of Job, is reflective of this testimony that God had of Job – there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?. Can this be said of us?

Points to ponder:

  1. Are we blessing the LORD at all times?
  2. What is God’s testimony of you/me today and what will it be when your/my life is over (hopefully full of days as was Job)?
  3. Can we have the heart of Job, one of integrity, that will bless the LORD at all times, NO MATTER WHAT?

No matter what – I will fight


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

In today’s text, taken from 1 Samuel 17, we will look at David, who chose to fight for God NO MATTER WHAT.

Many are probably familiar with the story of David and Goliath, but for the benefit of those who aren’t, as a backdrop to this character, David is summoned by his father Jesse to take food for his brothers who are at war with the Philistines. Upon arriving at the scene of the battle, he is troubled to hear the taunts of an over nine foot giant, name Goliath, who was hurling insults and defying the armies of God; the Israelite army. David confidently avers to fight the Philistine and in the conversation that ensues between him and Saul, the then king of Israel, David narrates his life experience of victory against a lion and a bear that had stolen one of his father’s sheep from the flock. He tells the king, how he went after the lion and the bear and smote it and delivered the sheep out of the mouth of the beast and when it arose against it, he caught it by its mane (beard) and slew it. He then tells the king that it was the Lord’s doing that delivered him from the paw of the lion and the paw of the bear, and now it was time to witness God continuing to do his work of deliverance from the Philistine giant Goliath. The consequences of David’s action meant that his life was in jeopardy from being killed by Goliath. David nonetheless chose to risk his life recognizing that he would emerge victoriously because his reliance was not on himself or his abilities, but on the Lord. David chose to fight for God NO MATTER WHAT the consequences would be. Long story short, David goes in the name of the Lord and fights the giant, defeating Goliath with a single sling shot to the giant’s head, and emerging victoriously.

David could have gone with a heart puffed with pride from his victories against the lion and the bear. He did not go to fight with the heart of a lion or the strength of a bear, but instead with a humble heart that trusted in the name of the Lord. David in short can be considered to be the giant in the duel, because he had God on his side, despite his relatively smaller size. If David had rationalized or thought of the consequences, he would have probably ended up being like one of the soldiers in Saul’s army – sore afraid, terrified and paralyzed in fear of fighting the giant. His act of courage not only did it deliver him and Saul’s army from those who defied God, but also earned him an entry into the Hall of Faith (Hebrews 11:32), an eventually established him as a king over all Israel (2 Samuel 7:8). Our acts of courage to fight for God, relying on His name, will deliver us from all the giants that taunt and try to enslave us and will establish us to reign with Him in God’s indestructible kingdom (Revelation 5:10) .

Points to ponder:

  1. What is God asking you and me to fight for?
  2. Can we take the step to fight for God, without rationalizing or thinking of the consequences, NO MATTER WHAT?

No matter what – I will be kind


Many decisions that ought to be taken are not taken due to one of the following reasons:
1. we try to rationalize the situation assuming that our finite and limited human minds has infinite comprehension and abilities or
2. we think of the consequences of the decision and are paralyzed for fear of life or fear of being ridiculed.

In today’s text, taken from Joshua 2, we will look at Rahab, who chose to be kind to God’s people NO MATTER WHAT.

As a backdrop to this character, Rahab was a harlot in the wealthy and pagan city Jericho. Joshua, Moses’ successor and God’s appointed sends two spies to spy the land, even Jericho and they arrive at Rahab’s place. The king of Jericho is warned of the spies and he sends a message to Rahab, inquiring about the  spies. Rahab, by faith, recognizing that these spies belonged to the Lord who is God of heaven and earth, welcomed them, hid them and helped them escape. She even misdirected the king’s men who came seeking after the spies. In response, she is given the promise to be spared when the Lord delivers the city of Jericho to Joshua and the Israelites. The consequences of Rahab’s action meant that her life could be in jeopardy from the king of Jericho  or his men. Rahab nonetheless chose to risk her life from the immediate present danger recognizing that her kindness will be repaid life for life (Joshua 2:14). Rahab chose to be kind to the spies NO MATTER WHAT the consequences would be.

Rahab in short can be considered to be a harlot heroine, a hooker who had a heart for God. If Rahab had rationalized or thought of the consequences, she would have possibly cost two spies their lives while her life may have been spared temporarily only until the time when the walls of Jericho came tumbling down and the Lord had given the city to Joshua. Her act of kindness not only did it spare her life eventually, but that of all her family. What is more is that she earned an entry into the Hall of Faith (Hebrews 11:31), and is counted in the same echelon as the patriarch Abraham (James 2:21-25)  and most importantly is one of the few women recorded in the genealogical account of the ultimate conquering King, Jesus Christ (Matthew 1:5). Our acts of kindness on God’s people, undoubtedly will not go unnoticed, and whatever is done even unto the least of the brethren will be counted as done unto God, Jesus the King himself (Matthew 25:40).

Also it is interesting to note that Rahab chose to be kind to the spies, NO MATTER WHAT and in return God chose to be kind with Rahab, sparing her life, NO MATTER WHO she was. 

Points to ponder:

  1. Who is God asking of you and me to be kind to today?
  2. Can we take the step to be kind unto one another, without rationalizing or thinking of the consequences, NO MATTER WHAT?