Christmas Perspectives :: Supreme to Simple


Christmas is the occasion when Jesus Christ, the mighty God (Isaiah 9:6-7), Supreme Lord over all of creation (Colossians 1:15; NLT), became a simple child and came to the world of man. Some of the definitions in the dictionary that you will find for the word “simple” are “easy to understand or deal with”, “not elaborate or artificial, plain”, “not complex or compound, single”. The unfathomable Supreme God of the universe became on Christmas day, the expressed image of the invisible God (Colossian 1:15), easy to understand, easy to deal with, an unelaborate, plain and real baby, not complex or compound, but the triune God in one.

Points to ponder:
Though Jesus is Supreme, he willfully chose to become simple, so that we who are the real simple ones, could become supreme, able to make mountains plain (Zechariah 4:5), as co-heirs with Christ of God’s glory (Romans 8:17), by the power of the Holy Spirit of God, who comes to dwell in all who believe in Jesus, for it is not by might, nor by power, but by the Holy Spirit, says the Lord (Zechariah 4:6-7). Are you supreme or simple?

Isaiah 9:6-7 (KJV)
For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.
Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end, upon the throne of David, and upon his kingdom, to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with justice from henceforth even for ever. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will perform this.

Colossians 1:15 (NLT)
15 Christ is the visible image of the invisible God. He existed before anything was created and is supreme over all creation

Romans 8:16-17 (KJV)
16 The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God:
17 And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together.

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Christmas Perspectives :: Prince to Pauper


Christmas is the occasion when Jesus Christ, the Prince of Peace (Isaiah 9:6-7), willfully left all the glories of heaven (Philippians 2:6-7) and came to the world of man, where he became a pauper in a worldly monetary and material sense, so much so that he advised that one cannot serve both God and money (Matthew 6:24), and advised the rich young man to sell all the possessions to be perfect (Matthew 19:21) as he was and go follow him, and even his tomb was borrowed (Isaiah 53:9).

Points to ponder:
Though Jesus is a Prince, the Prince of Peace, he became a pauper so that we who are really paupers, storing up our treasures here on earth, must be willing to relinquish all the glories of this world and go follow him, as princes and princesses of heaven. To all who believe and receive Jesus, he gave them the privilege to be called the children of God, which is other words, is that he made us princes and princesses of heaven if we believe in him.  This Christmas season, don’t let this question go unanswered – Are you a pauper or a prince / princess?

Philippians 2:6-8 (KJV)
Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God:
But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men:
And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.

Isaiah 9:6-7 (KJV)
For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.
Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end, upon the throne of David, and upon his kingdom, to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with justice from henceforth even for ever. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will perform this.

John 1:12 (KJV)
12 But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name:

Christmas Perspectives :: Heaven to Homeless


Christmas is the occasion when Jesus Christ, the God of heaven, willfully left his home (Philippians 2:6-7) and came to the world of man, where he became homeless (Matthew 8:20) for there was no place for him in even an inn. He did this so that man who was truly homeless (without a home in heaven) could find a home in heaven, by being accepted and adopted into God’s family (John 1:12), if we believe in Jesus as our Lord, and Savior and King.

Points to ponder:
Jesus said, he is going to prepare a place (home) for us in heaven, so that where he is, we may be also (John 14:3). In other words, at Christmas, Jesus became homeless so that we no longer need to be homeless. Are you homeless? If so, believe in the Lord Jesus, today (wait no longer), and be adopted into God’s family, so that you can call heaven your home. Are you homeless?

Philippians 2:6-8 (KJV)
Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God:
But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men:
And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.

Matthew 8:20 (KJV)
20 And Jesus saith unto him, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.

John 14:1-3 (KJV)
Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me.
In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you.
And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.

Thanksgiving Series: God, the Smiter and our Rescuer


Psalm 136 can be touted as the “The Psalm of Thanks” or the “Thanksgiving Psalm.” It is a Psalm that is rich in content, apropos the character of God and since each verse in the Psalm is suffixed with “For his mercy endures forever”, it is a Psalm that is easy to read and memorize as well.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, giving thanks for the ultimate reason of sending us his only begotten Son, we will be looking at each verse in Psalm 136 and glean out the character of God from these verses, which would be reason enough to be grateful and give thanks to our LORD God.

Today we look at Verses 10 and 11.
To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever:
And brought out Israel from among them: for his mercy endureth for ever:

These verses indicate that God is not only a smiter of our enemies, but is one who is a rescuer of slaves. The people of God were in physical bondage and slavery under the rule of the Pharoah in the land of Egypt and God heard their cries. He sent unto them his deliverer, Moses, who with the aid of God, led God’s people of out the land of slavery. During this exodus from Egypt, God’s power was manifested and the unrelenting obstinacy of Pharaoh, brought on Egypt many plagues and calamities, including costing the people of Egypt, their firstborn son.

Points to ponder:
At the onset, it may be easily misunderstood that God was a cruel God, who according to some atheists and anti-theists, was a murdering God, with no compassion for the firstborn. But, let us not forget that in order to save all of mankind from spiritual slavery, being in bondage and under the power of the devil, God did not ever spare his only begotten Son, Jesus Christ. God sent him as the ultimate deliverer from spiritual slavery, to be born of a virgin, in a manger, overshadowed by the Cross. Let us not forget that God smote the adversary, Shaitan (or Satan) and the last enemy which is death (1 Corinthians 15:26), freeing all who believe in him and his son, who was sent to and for us. God indeed is the smiter of our enemy and the rescuer from spiritual slavery and that is all the reason that we can be thankful for.

It is Christmas season and while many focus on Jesus as a baby in the manger, let us not forget to see him as the rescuing Knight that he really is.

Psalm 136:10-11 (KJV)
10 To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever:
11 And brought out Israel from among them: for his mercy endureth for ever:

Thanksgiving Series: For the LIGHT and lights


Psalm 136 can be touted as the “The Psalm of Thanks” or the “Thanksgiving Psalm.” It is a Psalm that is rich in content, apropos the character of God and since each verse in the Psalm is suffixed with “For his mercy endures forever”, it is a Psalm that is easy to read and memorize as well.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, giving thanks for the ultimate reason of sending us his only begotten Son, we will be looking at each verse in Psalm 136 and glean out the character of God from these verses, which would be reason enough to be grateful and give thanks to our LORD God.

Today we look at Verses 7 to 9.
To him that made great lights: for his mercy endureth for ever:
The sun to rule by day: for his mercy endureth for ever:
The moon and stars to rule by night: for his mercy endureth for ever.

These verses speak of two great lights that were made to rule, but according to the creation account recorded in Genesis 1:3, it is written, “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.” This not only establishes that fact that the sun, moon and stars are not the source of true light, but it was this LIGHT that was in the beginning (even before the creation of the sun, moon and stars (great lights)) that is the true source of LIGHT that dispels real darkness. This is further accentuated in the scripture, where it is written that Jesus, the Agnus Dei, the Lamb of God who dispels spiritual darkness (sin) of the world, is the light in the city of God (heaven) which does not have the need for the sun or the moon (Revelation 21:23). Jesus is the LIGHT. He was not created. He simply was and is and forever will be – from everlasting to everlasting (Psalm 90:2). In the beginning was the LIGHT and that LIGHT was with God and the LIGHT was God (John 1:1) for Jesus said, “I am the LIGHT of the World (John 8:12), and whoever follows him shall not walk in darkness – spiritual darkness, separated from God, but have the light of life.” 

Points to ponder:
It is Christmas season and as one ponders about the birth of Jesus Christ in a manger, sometimes getting lost in the festivities, let us not forget that on Christmas night, Jesus had his birth in the form of a man, but not his beginning, but more importantly let us not overlook the true meaning of Christmas and that is “The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined.” (Isaiah 9:2; Matthew 4:16). Jesus is the greatest of all lights, the maker and ruler of all other lights. Are you still in darkness? Is your life a slave to sin? Ask Jesus to be born in your heart so that he can dispel all darkness and by that you can have the light of life. Now, that is a great reason to be thankful for.

Psalm 136:7-9 (KJV)
To him that made great lights: for his mercy endureth for ever:
The sun to rule by day: for his mercy endureth for ever:
The moon and stars to rule by night: for his mercy endureth for ever.

Revelation 21:23 (KJV)
23 And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine in it: for the glory of God did lighten it, and the Lamb is the light thereof.

Isaiah 9:2 (KJV)
The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined.

Matthew 4:16 (KJV)
16 The people which sat in darkness saw great light; and to them which sat in the region and shadow of death light is sprung up.

Thanksgiving Series: Wise & Creator God


Psalm 136 can be touted as the “The Psalm of Thanks” or the “Thanksgiving Psalm.” It is a Psalm that is rich in content, apropos the character of God and since each verse in the Psalm is suffixed with “For his mercy endures forever”, it is a Psalm that is easy to read and memorize as well.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, giving thanks for the ultimate reason of sending us his only begotten Son, we will be looking at each verse in Psalm 136 and glean out the character of God from these verses, which would be reason enough to be grateful and give thanks to our LORD God.

Today we look at Verses 5 and 6.
To him that by wisdom made the heavens: for his mercy endureth for ever.
To him that stretched out the earth above the waters: for his mercy endureth for ever.

Not only does this verse establish the fact that, God is wise, but it also asserts that God is a creator God. In fact, only God is wise (Romans 16:27; 1 Timothy 1:17; Jude 1:25), for even our wisdom is foolishness before God (1 Corinthians 3:19). You could take the smartest of the smart in this world, even Solomon the wise, who when pitched against God in wisdom, would turn out to be a fool. Our God is a creator God. Out of nothing, he can create (ex nihilo bara). When the earth was formless and void (nothing), God’s Holy Spirit hovered it and God created everything by his wisdom (Genesis 1) 

Points to ponder:
Out of the barrenness / emptiness / voidness of our life, when the Holy Spirit of God hovers over our dark and tumultuous life, as the waves (circumstances) of life try to engulf us, God can speak fullness of life (abundant life) into us (John 10:10), when we believe and trust in him.  He can stretch forth his hand over those waters and command “Peace” (Mark 4:35-41); a peace that passeth all understanding (Philippians 4:7) given to those whose mind is fixed on Jesus trusting him (Isaiah 26:3; Hebrews 12:2)  and assure us to “Be still and know that he is God” (Psalm 46:10)

Psalm 136:5-6 (KJV)
To him that by wisdom made the heavens: for his mercy endureth for ever.
To him that stretched out the earth above the waters: for his mercy endureth for ever.

 

Thanksgiving Series: Wonder Working God


Psalm 136 can be touted as the “The Psalm of Thanks” or the “Thanksgiving Psalm.” It is a Psalm that is rich in content, apropos the character of God and since each verse in the Psalm is suffixed with “For his mercy endures forever”, it is a Psalm that is easy to read and memorize as well.

In the spirit of Thanksgiving, giving thanks for the ultimate reason of sending us his only begotten Son, we will be looking at each verse in Psalm 136 and glean out the character of God from these verses, which would be reason enough to be grateful and give thanks to our LORD God.

Today we look at Verse 4.
To him who alone doeth great wonders: for his mercy endureth for ever.

Not only does this verse establish the fact that, God does wonder, but that he does great wonders, besides asserts that it is he alone who does great wonders. God does great wonders, because he is a great God (Psalm 86:10). When Jesus’ birth was prophesied, it was recorded that his name shall be called WONDERFUL. (Isaiah 9:6-7) During his time on earth as man, Jesus did many wonders and signs, and miracles, as one approved of God (Acts 2:22) – from turning water into wine, to turning enemies into friends (Luke 23:12). 

Points to ponder:
Not only did Jesus perform mighty wonders when he was on earth as man, but even today as the Son of Man in heaven, he continues to do the greatest miracle of all, which is, he accepts all those who believe in him (even his enemies who are friends with this ephemeral world) as his friend – a friend of God. That truly is wonderful, and indeed Jesus is a wonder working God.  We can give thanks for He is a Wonder Working God – truly Wonderful – full of wonders. Are you a friend of God?

Psalm 136:4 (KJV)
4 To him who alone doeth great wonders: for his mercy endureth for ever.